Archive for the ‘I don’t have that?’ Category

Insurance & Restaurants   Leave a comment

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Everyone loves to eat out, which in recent years has led to the development of many new restaurants. This can include a wide variety of types of service, from a food truck to a place of fine dining.  As the restaurant industry grows, so do the needs of those involved in the industry – especially their needs for appropriate insurance to protect themselves.

The food industry has reported both job creation and revenue growth over the course of the last six years. This includes a 3.8% revenue increase, and over 14 million people currently employed in the industry.  While it is great that the food industry is doing so well, what does this have to do with insurance?  It means that there is a growing market of business owners that need specialized coverage based on their risks.

For example, if you own a food truck, it’s likely that if you had a fire or other devastating loss it will take you some time to find or build a replacement vehicle.  While this is taking place, do you have coverage to replace the income you’re losing?  How will you pay your bills?

If you own a more traditional restaurant, do you have coverage for a power outage?  What about a power outage due to power lines downed in a storm?  What if your food spoils while the power is out – is your inventory covered for spoilage?  Similarly, if you have a refrigerant/contamination issue – do you have coverage?

The special types of coverage that are listed are just a few of many that agents and restaurant owners alike need to be aware of to help both industries grow and flourish.  Feel free to call or email with questions or concerns you might have!

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Some Wintery Insurance Tips   Leave a comment

Sammy Bo

Sammy Bo loves the snow!

Long time no post!  This El Nino winter has been a strange one here in Pittsburgh.  The on-again off-again wintery weather has kept us busy.    The Insurance Dogger loves the snow, so this winter has been an emotional roller coaster to be sure!

A month into winter and we’ve received an unusual array of claims for this time of year – of course we are seeing the normal frozen pipes, chipped windshields (salt wreaks havoc on your glass!), and sliding on ice.  But we are also seeing some unusual-for-winter claims as well – in particular, sewage backing up in basements, which is far more common in spring & early summer.  The heavy snowfall, followed by rapidly rising temps and even occasional rain showers has simply been too much for many sewage systems to handle.

All of this has gotten us to thinking, in light of some of the conversations we’ve had to have with clients, it’s time to do a brief update & post on choosing your insurance coverage – both home and auto. 

I can’t tell you how many times a client has told us they want to insure their cars or home “as cheaply as possible.”  Though this is a thought process we work very hard to counter, it’s not always feasible to adjust this mindset.  When you’ve had a claim is NOT when you want to find out that if you spent a couple extra dollars per month, you would have saved yourself a lot of heartache.

Once you’ve had a claim, you cannot backdate a change to your policy to provide you with the coverage you need – even if you offer to pay for the additional premium.

Here are a few coverage options to consider having on your policy to avoid stress & financial difficulty:

Auto Insurance

Comprehensive physical damage – do not confusion this with collision coverage, or “full” coverage.  As explained previously here on the Dog Blog, comprehensive coverage (in Pennsylvania) protects against things like glass damage, hail damage, fire, theft, flooding, or hitting a deer.  Even if you remove Collision coverage from your vehicle, we always recommend retaining Comprehensive on your policy, as it is a cheap way to provide protection against a number of different claims.

Rental Reimbursement & Towing and Labor – Again, previously explained on the Dog Blog, these two extremely inexpensive coverages will save you A LOT of stress in the event of a covered claim.  Towing & Labor, which provides similar benefits as AAA membership for a fraction of the cost, is a particularly useful during the winter months. It provides everything from jumping a dead battery to pulling your car out of a ditch after sliding on black ice.  Rental reimbursement pays you back for the use of a rental car (with policy-specific limits – ask your agent) in the event that a covered claim puts your car in the shop for an extended period of time.

Increased Property Damage liability limit – Did you slide on slushy roads and rear-end that brand new Mercedes driving in front of you?  We recommend all clients carry AT LEAST $50,000 of Property Damage liability coverage, if not $100,000 or more.  Sleep peacefully knowing that you have the protection you need if you damage an expensive car (or cars!) or home.

Homeowners/Renters Insurance

Sewer & Drain back up – Put simply, S&D B/U (as I call it) protects you in the event that sewage backs up through your floor drains or water overflows from your sump pump.  The coverage is available on both owners and renters policies.  Though this is more common in spring & summer – add it now to ensure A) you don’t get any nasty surprises during this unusual weather season and B) you don’t forget to add it before the spring rains start.

Preventing pipes from freezing – though not a specific coverage, preventing your pipes from freezing in winter is crucial to preventing an unforeseen catastrophe – especially if your power goes out!  Some useful links with more in depth information were provided last winter, but there are several easy things you can do to prevent your pipes from freezing during cold snaps.  If you know you are not going to be home for 24 hours or more, ALWAYS shut your water off at the main.  This prevents water from flowing continuously from a burst pipe.  If you have pipes closed up within a cabinet (like your kitchen sink), open the cabinet from time to time to warm things up – and leave the doors open during especially cold times (when temps drop below zero Fahrenheit).  If your power goes out during a storm or a cold snap, turn all faucets on exterior walls on to a slight drip to ensure the pipes don’t freeze.

Identity Theft – OK OK, identity theft has nothing to do with winter weather, but especially during the Christmas shopping season, it bears repeating that the $20-30 per year that you spend on identity theft is money extremely well spent.  In 2014 alone, nearly 10% of all Americans were a victim of identity theft.  If that’s not enough to motivate you, consider that nearly 15% of identity theft victims suffered a direct financial loss of at least $1,000.  At $20 per year, it would take 50 years to make up the difference with premium savings to cover a $1,000 loss!

To summarize – a few simple and inexpensive steps now can prevent a great deal of stress down the road!  Contact your agent to discuss any questions or concerns you might have.

Slow down and drive carefully!

Always drive slowly and carefully when the snow is flying!

Motorcycle Insurance – coverage review   Leave a comment

Motorcycle season

It’s motorcycle season!!

Good morning everyone!

For those in Western PA, motorcycle season is very nearly upon us, and if you’re like me, that’s an exciting and gratifying thing indeed.  Four to five very long months of waiting can get rough on us all.

One thing that tends to sit on the backburner is the motorcycle insurance renewal that almost always also comes through at this time.  As such, now is as good a time as any to give a quick run-down on motorcycle coverage and things to consider.

Some of the coverages on a motorcycle policy will mirror those on your auto policy – bodily injury and property damage liability are good examples.  Liability coverage pays for the medical expenses and damages others suffer, for which you are responsible (in an accident).

Uninsured & underinsured medical provides coverage for you and your passenger’s medical expenses in the event of an accident where someone else is at fault and either doesn’t have sufficient coverage, or any insurance at all, to pay for your bills.  And, of course, you can buy physical damage coverage on your motorcycle itself if it’s stolen or damaged.

Beyond that, though, is where the differences start to appear.  For example, many first party benefits coverages either are unavailable or very expensive to obtain.  These coverages provide protection for you in the event that you are injured in an at-fault accident for things like medical bills, lost income, or funeral expenses.

Roadside assistance and/or trip interruption can function differently on a motorcycle policy – depending on the company you go to, you can get coverage for a flatbed tow (not typically available on regular auto policies) or other motorcycle-specific services.  On occasion, you can even get coverage for unexpected expenses resulting from an accident or breakdown – such as the cost of staying in a hotel.

There is also more readily available coverage for accessories and “carried” contents on your bike.  Several insurance companies provide a small amount of accessory coverage automatically when you buy physical damage coverage on your bike.

If you have done a great deal of modification, have an antique or custom bike, make sure to go over the best way to properly insure your baby – otherwise, you might be in a position where you have to cover most of the cost of those same mods out of pocket in the event of a claim. 

One final thing to consider – keep your safety courses up to date (within the past three years).  This will you provide you with a moderate to major discount on your coverage, and is a great refresher for those safety skills you learned years ago.  For Pennsylvania riders, head to the PA MSF website to find and schedule a class.

Shameless plug – as a licensed rider & Harley owner who is registered to provide motorcycle coverage through multiple insurance companies (like Rider, Progressive, AIC, and more!), I am excited to work with you to provide competitive quotes.  We can re-evaluate your coverage, and potentially get you better coverage for less money.  Do business with someone who knows and understands the passion and dangers involved so you can ride with peace of mind.  The quoting process takes approximately 15-20 minutes.  Please complete the following form, and I will get in touch with you soon to begin the process. 

Identity Theft, Flood Insurance, and antique coverage – Part Three   Leave a comment

In this final installment of our 3 part mini-series, we are going to review a little bit of information about coverage for antiques and high-value items you may have in your home.

This is a topic that I covered briefly in my post reviewing homeowner’s insurance (HOI) in general.  As discussed there, while most HOI policies provide replacement level coverage for dwelling and contents, there are very specific limitations in place regarding antique, unique, and high value items.  Replacement coverage is defined as “like kind and quality” but does not specify replacing unique items with exact or proximate matches – for example, an antique grandfather clock will typically be replaced with a newer version of the same unless specifically scheduled.

Policies and guidelines will differ from company to company, but in general, HOI policies do not provide adequate coverage for your specialty items:

Antiques:  Typically this is an item that is at least 50 years old, is out of production, and generally can be considered challenging to replace.  It can be just about anything – Griswold Cast Iron Skillets , Seth Thomas Mantel Clocks, or antique jewelry are just a few examples – and will need to be specifically scheduled on the policy to receive the appropriate level of coverage.  An appraisal will almost always be required.

Unique Items & Artwork:   Another broad category of items, this would include collectibles (like Hummel figurines), collections (like baseball cards), and a vast array of artwork – paintings, pottery, statuaries & sculptures, and more.  This coverage typically applies to higher value or difficult to replace items, will need to be specifically schedule, and will require an appraisal.

High Value Items:  This is basically a catch-all for items that don’t fall into one of the first two categories, and most commonly is non-antique jewelry.  Coverage can be placed in two ways: in a blanket format (one total limit for all pieces) for mid-level values (individual pieces typically less than $2500-$3000), or on a scheduled basis (each piece individually listed) for high value items (greater than $3000 each).  For high value scheduled items, an appraisal will be required.

These scheduled items will be covered on a policy form called “Inland Marine.”  I won’t bore you with the history of why it’s called that, but it will provide you with the more detailed and specific coverage you are seeking for your high value and unique/irreplaceable items.  For the amount of coverage purchased, especially since most Inland Marine policies or endorsements carry $0 deductibles, you will pay a relatively minor amount of premium.  I hope that you found this series to be enlightening and informative, and if you have questions, you can always feel free to email me at scott@poleskyagency.com or find me on Facebook!

The Insurance Dogger does not have a great deal of respect for delicate items!!

The Insurance Dogger does not have a great deal of respect for delicate items!!

Not funny, Insurance Dogger!  Not funny!

Not funny, Insurance Dogger! Not funny!

 

Identity Theft, Flood Insurance, and antique coverage – Part One   1 comment

It’s hard to believe how quickly time is going by!  It seems like just yesterday that it was -30*F and now we’re nearly halfway through May already!  In  other words, I really hope you’ll forgive my lengthy absence from blogging.

Today I’m going to start a series addressing a couple different things to consider when insuring your home.  As you are certainly aware, things are moving at a pretty rapid pace these days – even for our government!  So that means there are a lot of things for you to keep up with as a home owner or renter, not the least of which are threats to the fidelity of your personal & financial identity and protecting your home against flood waters.

We’ll start with the one that affects virtually everyone – data breach and identity theft.  It’s hard to imagine that anyone hasn’t yet heard about the thieves that struck Target right before Christmas, accessing the credit information of millions of customers and having a major & long-term impact on Target, both financially and from a human resources perspective.  And, of course, there has also been the recent Heartbleed attack and the vulnerabilities of Internet Explorer.

Coupled with the dramatic increase in usage of social media , especially on smart phones, and the amount of business being done online means the chance of having your identity stolen has become dangerously high.  All you need to do is take a look at a couple statistics – here or here or here – to know that the risk now is greater than ever before.  Yet many customers do not have any form of identity theft coverage on their homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy.  For a relatively minimal amount of premium – $25-50 a year on average – you can add typically $25,000 of identity recovery insurance.

Bear in mind, Identity Theft insurance is intended to assist you in restoring your good name by assigning you a coach or assistant to work you through the process, as well as paying for credit reports and monitoring, but not to restore what’s been stolen.  Your insurance company will, via your coach, work with the credit card companies to remove fraudulent charges and with your bank to restore what was stolen.  The final decision, though, rests with each of your financial institutions, not with your insurance company.

To summarize, for a minimal amount of premium each year, you can gain a lot of assistance in protecting your identity!  (PS – if you’re renting, and you don’t have a renter’s policy – that’s a cheap and easy problem to solve – much cheaper than you think!)

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Will the real Slim Sammy please stand up?

A review of Personal Insurance – Home Owners (Part 1)   1 comment

dog blog

Sitting at home, blogging away!

Homeowners coverage.  Where to begin?  With your home, of course!  In this “installment,”  I’m going to review a couple things to keep in mind while reviewing or considering insuring your home – based on the assumption that you own, not rent.

The primary “concern” of homeowners is protecting the actual dwelling itself.  As there are quite a few formats to do this, I’m only going to cover the most common form, called an HO5 policy

Under an HO5 homeowners policy, the dwelling is covered for comprehensive perils at replacement cost valuation.

  • Comprehensive Perils – CP is actually easier to explain by starting with its counter-part, named perils.  A named perils policy means that only claims (causes of loss or perils) specifically named on the policy are covered – if it’s not listed, it’s not covered.  Comprehensive perils is the opposite – if a cause of loss is not specifically excluded, it’s covered.  Every company has its own list of excluded losses, but some common ones are flood, acts of war, intentional acts of the homeowner (arson, for example), and wear and tear (in other words, maintenance is typically NOT covered!).
  • Replacement Cost Valuation – RCV describes how payment for a loss will be made.  When you carry RCV coverage, a loss will be paid out based on the true cost to repair or replace damaged goods (less your deductible).  Actual Cash Value, by contrast, pays based on the cost to repair or replace MINUS depreciation (typically based on age and condition). 

Understanding RCV is what typically causes frustration.  The easiest way to understand how this works is by using an example.  If you have a fire in your home, and the kitchen is destroyed, RCV dictates that the insurance company pay the cost of restoring your kitchen (as closely as possible) to its original condition, REGARDLESS of the age of materials there.  In other words, your cabinets may be 15 years old, but an RCV policy pays for the cost of brand new cabinets (comparable – “like kind and quality”).

The replacement cost valuation of your home is commonly found by entering in the characteristics of your home into software designed for this purpose – how many square feet, how many stories, year built, updates, style, construction, etc etc.  A common source of confusion is that the RCV of your home is often greater than the market value of the house – this occurs because the cost to rebuild per square foot is almost always higher than the actual market value per square foot – but this works in your favor!  If a home policy were written based on market value, and you had the kitchen fire described above – guess what!  The cost to repair would not be paid in full: unless your kitchen were brand new, it’s virtually impossible that it’s market value would be anywhere close to what the replacement value is!

Contents Coverage – Another important component of your homeowners policy is contents, or personal property, coverage.  This is for the actual contents of your home – simply put, anything that’s not permanently attached.  So all of your clothing, furnishings, appliances/electronics, decorations, etc etc.  This is almost always calculated as a percentage of your building limit – 60, 70, and 80% are the most common levels. 

Something important to remember – if you have high-value, unique, antique, or difficult to replace items, it’s generally a good idea to schedule them on the policy.  Most policies have limitations or exclusions for these items that generally mean that you are only going to get a fraction of what they are actually worth.  In addition, by scheduling items, you can typically get minimal or zero dollar deductibles, which drastically reduces your out of pocket expense in the event of the loss.  The coverage tends to be more expensive than general contents (PP) coverage, but in the long run is far more beneficial!

Liability Coverage – The last of the major coverages I will review today is liability coverage, which covers damage or “injury” for others.  The most common example of a liability situation would be if a person (NOT a guest of yours, who are covered by “Medical Payments” coverage) were on your property, slipped and fell, and required you to pay for their injury and rehab costs.  This would be covered by the liability coverage on your policy.   Other examples of common liability claims would be if you happened to accidentally damaged someone else’s goods – knocking over the TV in their house, hitting a baseball through their picture window, etc.  It would also cover injuries caused if your dog bites someone.  Contact your agent if you have questions about what would and wouldn’t be covered by your liability coverage. 

A common situation that often causes consternation – what if your neighbor’s tree fell over onto your property and damaged your home?  Would that be covered by your neighbor’s liability coverage, or your dwelling coverage?  Everyone’s favorite answer:  That depends.  If the tree is long since dead and your neighbor has been negligent in removing it, then his liability policy would cover your damages.  HOWEVER, if the tree is still alive, and was simply blown over by the wind, or some other similar “unforeseeable” incident, then the damages would be paid out of your dwelling coverage (and subject to your deductible). 

Some other coverages to consider:  Loss of Use, Other Structures, Medical Payments, Inland Marine Floater (see Scheduled goods)

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Tuckered out after a long day of writing!

Concerns about the Affordable Care Act   2 comments

Some of the reasons why the Affordable Care Act (ACA) gives me a great deal of concern about it’s potential economic impact:

  • Employers are required to provide coverage if they have 50 or more full-time employees, or face paying taxes and fines
  • Individuals are required to carry coverage, or face paying taxes and fines
  • A 5% Affordable Care Act tax to subsidize uninsured individuals
  • Limits employer contribution to flexible spending account to $2500
  • Confusing definitions on who is an employee vs sub-contractor
  • An excise (read: sales) tax will be charged on “Cadillac” health plans starting in 2018

The two really serious kickers to the whole program:

  •  Health insurance companies will be required to spend at least 80% of premiums collected on the provision of care, drastically limiting how much revenue can be used for administrative costs and profit.  This will likely create incentive for companies to reduce overhead expenses, such as customer service and claims-processing employees.

AND THE MOST CONTROVERSIAL POINT OF ALL:  

  • Starting in 2014, health insurers cannot charge higher rates to those who will use more medical services (and thus costing insurers more money)!!  This creates a subsidy situation where customers who don’t use medical services very often will still pay increased premiums to pay for the medical services of those who use them more often.

In other words, forget underwriting, forget being able to charge more for the customers who will cost more.  EVERYONE is going to have to pay more in order to subsidize those who are more expensive to the insurance companies – for example, people who have pre-existing conditions and, usually, women.  I certainly have nothing against women.  But if the reality is that insuring a woman is more expensive that insuring a man, then a comparable plan for a woman should cost more than a man’s.  That, unfortunate though it may be, is how insurance works – if you cost more, you pay more.  This will no longer be the case under the Affordable Care Act.

Not charging more for those with pre-existing conditions would be comparable to an auto insurance company not being allowed to charge more for drivers who have prior claims.  So even though people with pre-existing conditions will cost carriers more money than those without pre-existing conditions, they cannot be charged more.  Top that off with the 80% premiums-for-care requirement, and we are facing a situation where a health insurer cannot hire the most qualified individuals (because they are not allowed to divert the money from revenue for care), cannot provide the best services (by hiring more customer service representatives, adjusters, billing employees, etc), and cannot charge people based on their potential cost to the company.

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